Artwork: Monumentals

Following are details on the 18 monumental alebrije sculptures. Thirty smaller alebrijes are displayed throughout the gardens and inside the First Division Museum through October.

Octavio

Location: Allée

Octavio rises 15 feet from its grassy nest with eight long tentacles ablaze in color. This spectacular sculpture is the collaboration of all six artists and the crowning achievement of “Alebrijes: Creatures of a Dream World”. This monumental alebrije was fabricated entirely at Cantigny.

Monumental Alebrijes

Avellano

Artist: Roberto Carlos Martínez Tecillo
Location: Prairie View

  • Meaning/Description: A magical dog that protects your dreams while searching for your truest dreams. Meaning Hazel,
    Avellano is named after the similarity of a hazel branch, which ends in two points.
  • Animals: Two-headed Dog
  • Materials: Metal structure, chicken wire, craft & recycled paper, wrapping plastic, acrylic paint, polyurethane finish
  • Number of pieces: 4
  • Time spent: 2 months
  • People involved: Seven

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Bicefalo entre el bien y mal

Artist: Alberto Moreno Fernández
Location: Allée/Octagon Garden

  • Meaning/Description: Bicefalo (two-headed) Between Good and Evil. The two heads depict the Yin and Yang — a representation of the good and the bad in one’s life. The dragon was chosen as a universal powerful figure recognized around the world.
  • Animals: Dragon + Cobra + Serpent
  • Materials: Metal structure, chicken wire, craft & recycled paper, acrylic paint, polyurethane finish
  • Time spent: 2-3 months
  • People involved: Six (in Mexico, including Alberto’s parents and nephew), and all the people here in the park.

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El Baron

Artist: Alberto Moreno Fernández
Location: McCormick House

  • Meaning/Description: Baron, a rank of nobility or title of honor, often hereditary, in various European countries. The name Alberto means “noble”, so the artist connected his name to this piece in that way.
  • Animals: Peacock + Antelope
  • Materials: Metal structure, chicken wire, craft & recycled paper, acrylic paint, polyurethane finish
  • Time spent: 2-3 months
  • People involved: Six (in Mexico, including Alberto’s parents and nephew), and all the people here in the park.

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Firulais

Artist: Alejandro Camacho Barrera
Location: Tank Park

  • Dog/Axolotl, guardian of the night. It is a representation of the Aztec myth of Lord Xolotl and his transformation from dog to axolotl. According to the Aztec myth, Xolotl, the underworld Dog God, was asked to sacrifice to benefit the human race. He did not accept and run away transforming himself into a Maguey plant until he was found. He came upon the lake Xochimilco and jumped, transforming into an ajolote (axolotl) – a Mexican salamander in danger of extinction. Firulais also represents a Mexcalpixtle, another endangered species.
  • Animals: Dog + Frog + Axolotl
  • Materials: 70% metal structure, 25% craft & recycled paper, polyurethane foam, acrylic paint, polyurethane finish
  • Number of pieces: 4 — body, tail, two frog legs
  • Time spent: 2 months
  • People involved: About 10 people total.
    Working on them physically: six (Alejandro, Miriam, their son and three apprentices)
    Others helped with donations (paper, recycled materials), and even helping them load the trucks.

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Goliath

Artist: Edgar Israel Camargo Reyes
Location: Cantigny Golf

  • Meaning/Description: Named after Edgar’s father, who was a bodybuilder when he was young, and his nickname was Goliath.
  • Animals: Deer + Giraffe + Eagle
  • Materials: Metal structure, chicken wire, craft & recycled paper, wood sticks, acrylic paint, polyurethane finish
  • Number of pieces: 10
  • Time spent: 2 months
  • People involved: Six

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Iguano

Artist: Roberto Carlos Martínez Tecillo
Location: Education Center

  • Meaning/Description: Influenced
  • Animals: Ant + Scorpion + Frog
  • Materials: Metal structure, chicken wire, craft & recycled paper, wrapping plastic, acrylic paint, polyurethane finish
  • Number of pieces: 3
  • Time spent: 2 months
  • People involved: Seven

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Jonás

Artist: Edgar Israel Camargo Reyes
Location: Prairie

  • Meaning/Description: References Edgar’s favorite bible story, Jonah and the whale. Edgar always admires the strong faith Jonah has that God will come and save him.
  • Animals: Whale + Deep Sea Fish
  • Materials: Metal structure, chicken wire, craft & recycled paper, wood sticks, acrylic paint, polyurethane finish
  • Number of pieces: 8
  • Time spent: 2 months
  • People involved: Six, with about a dozen helping with donations (paper, recycled materials), and even helping them load the trucks.

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Lacuarium

Artist: Alejandro Camacho Barrera
Location: Gold Pond/McCormick House

  • Agile sea dweller, it combines its Seahorse/Dragon attributes and long Octopus arms with a watchful double-headed snake tail.
  • Animals: Seahorse + Dragon + Octopus + Two-headed Serpent
  • Materials: 70% metal structure, 25% craft & recycled paper, polyurethane foam, acrylic paint, polyurethane finish
  • Number of pieces: 5 — head, two fins, tail, support base
  • Time spent: 2 months
  • People involved: About 10 people total.
    Working on them physically: six (Alejandro, Miriam, their son and three apprentices)
    Others helped with donations (paper, recycled materials), and even helping them load the trucks.

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La Maraña


Artist: Emanuel Arturo Zarate Ortíz
Location: Prairie View

  • Meaning/Description: A very challenging piece that is supported on two points only, with curves that are not simple to achieve.
  • Animals: Serpent + Deer + Jaguar + Eagle + Ladybug
  • Materials: Plastic bottles, iron, beer and soda cans, carton, craft paper, fabric, resin, and acrylic paint. 90% of the materials used in Arturo’s pieces are recycled.
  • Number of pieces: 9
  • Time spent: Approximately 2 months
  • People involved: Three – Arturo, his nephew, and his apprentice.

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Malucan


Artist: Emanuel Arturo Zarate Ortíz
Location: Allée

  • Meaning/Description: An important and challenging piece
  • Animals: Toucan + Monkey + Jaguar + Frog + Eagle + Butterfly + Bull
  • Materials: Plastic bottles, iron, beer and soda cans, carton, craft paper, fabric, resin, and acrylic paint. 90% of the materials used in Arturo’s pieces are recycled.
  • Number of pieces: Two wings, two claws, body, beak, tail, horns
  • Time spent: Approximately 2 months
  • People involved: Three – Arturo, his nephew, and his apprentice.

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Macario

Artist: Emanuel Arturo Zarate Ortíz
Location: Prairie View

  • Meaning/Description: A stylized, attractive piece with fine traits that can be seen from a far distance.
  • Animals: Dog + Deer + Heron
  • Materials: Plastic bottles, iron, beer and soda cans, carton, craft paper, fabric, resin, and acrylic paint. 90% of the materials used in Arturo’s pieces are recycled.
  • Number of pieces: Tail, two back legs, body, head
  • Time spent: Approximately 2 months
  • People involved: Three – Arturo, his nephew, and his apprentice.

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Mykel

Artist: Edgar Israel Camargo Reyes
Location: McCormick House

  • Meaning/Description: In honor of Edgar’s father-in-law who died of COVID two years ago. The place where his father-in-law built his house is known for having a big frog population.
  • Animals: Toad + Butterfly + Alien eyes and claws
  • Materials: Metal structure, chicken wire, craft & recycled paper, wood sticks, acrylic paint, polyurethane finish
  • Number of pieces: 7
  • Time spent: 2 months
  • People involved: Six, with about a dozen helping with donations (paper, recycled materials), and even helping them load the trucks.

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Nochipa ipan noyoltsin

Artist: Roberto Carlos Martínez Tecillo
Location: Allée

  • Meaning/Description: “Forever in your heart” in Nahuatl
  • Animals: Deer + Cat + Rooster
  • Materials: Metal structure, chicken wire, craft & recycled paper, wrapping plastic, acrylic paint, polyurethane finish
  • Number of pieces: 4
  • Time spent: 2 months
  • People involved: Seven

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Osita Emilia

 

Artist: Perla Miriam Salgado Zamorano
Location: Parade Field

  • Meaning/Description: Dream companion. She dispels nightmares with her butterfly wings and is always on the lookout to defend children’s dreams with her snake tail. Osita Emilia represents Miriam – she is happy, brightly colored and quite feminine. Osita Emilia’s concept is born from “Tarascon”, which was the first alebrije the park and partners saw when initial conversations about the exhibit started. They liked it so much that wanted a female version of it. Emilia was named after Miriam’s son, Emilio, because technically this alebrije is Miriam’s daughter. Miriam wanted to represent his kids on all her pieces because this project was a family project.
  • Animals: Bear
  • Materials: Metal structure, chicken wire, craft & recycled paper, acrylic paint, polyurethane finish
  • Number of pieces: 9
  • Time spent: 2 months
  • People involved: People involved: Six, with about a dozen helping with donations (paper, recycled materials), and even helping them load the trucks.
  • Hidden Message: All of Miriam’s pieces have “Viva Mexico” written on them along with a Mexican flag.

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Patapez


Artist: Alejandro Camacho Barrera
Location: Gold Pond

  • Meaning/Description: Fantastic fish of the deep sea, it can move on the seabed, as well as on the land surface, with its webbed extremities.
  • Animals: Fish + Dragon + Frog
  • Materials: 70% metal structure, 25% craft & recycled paper, polyurethane foam, acrylic paint, polyurethane finish
  • Number of pieces: 5 — body, two fins, crest, light
  • Time spent: Approximately 2 months
  • People involved: About 10 people total.
    Working on them physically: six (Alejandro, Miriam, their son and three apprentices)
    Others helped with donations (paper, recycled materials), and even helping them load the trucks.

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Tarascon


Artist: Perla Miriam Salgado Zamorano
Location: Upper Display Garden

  • Meaning/Description: From a mythical medieval dream, he is a winged guardian, with the strength of a jaguar, the tail of a serpent, and the attributes of a dragon. Tarascon was the first alebrije the park and partners saw when initial conversations about the exhibit started. They liked it so much that wanted a female version of it and so Emilia’s concept was born.
  • Animals: Bear + Dragon + Serpent
  • Materials: Metal structure, chicken wire, craft & recycled paper, acrylic paint, polyurethane finish
  • Number of pieces: 9
  • Time spent: 2 months
  • People involved: People involved: Six, with about a dozen helping with donations (paper, recycled materials), and even helping them load the trucks.
  • Hidden Message: All of Miriam’s pieces have “Viva Mexico” written on them along with a Mexican flag.

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Tochtli

 

Artist: Perla Miriam Salgado Zamorano
Location: Hosta Garden

  • Meaning/Description: FNoble giant named in the Nahuatl language, it is a happy and jumping rabbit/iguana.
  • Animals: Rabbit + Iguana
  • Materials: Metal structure, chicken wire, craft & recycled paper, acrylic paint, polyurethane finish
  • Number of pieces: 9
  • Time spent: 2 months
  • People involved: People involved: Six, with about a dozen helping with donations (paper, recycled materials), and even helping them load the trucks.
  • Hidden Message: All of Miriam’s pieces have “Viva Mexico” written on them along with a Mexican flag.

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Xolo

Artist: Alberto Moreno Fernández
Location: Allée

  • Meaning/Description: Short for “Xoloitzcuintli” (pronounced “show-low-itz-QUEENT-ly”). Sometimes known as the Mexican Hairless dog. In the language of the Aztecs: Xolotl, the god of lightning and death, and itzcuintli, or dog. According to Aztec belief, the Dog of Xolotl was created by the god to guard the living and guide the souls of the dead through the dangers of Mictlán, the Underworld. They have orange stripes on their back, the only color our dear dead ones can see. This piece also features Bougainville flowers, characteristic of Mexico.
  • Animals: Dog
  • Materials: Metal structure, chicken wire, craft & recycled paper, acrylic paint, polyurethane finish
  • Time spent: 2 months
  • People involved: Six (in Mexico, including Alberto’s parents and nephew), and all the people here in the park.

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