Education Standards Alignment

Science and Nature at Cantigny Park

Biodiversity and Adaptations

Performance Expectations

Grade 3

3-LS1-1
Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles, but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death.

3-LS2-1
Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive.

3-LS3-2
Use evidence to support the explanation that traits can be influences by the environment.

3-LS4-2
Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.

3-LS4-4
Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.

Grade 4

4-LS1-1
Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior and reproduction.

Grade 5

5-PS3-1
Use models to describe that energy in animals’ food (used for body repair, growth, motion, and to maintain body warmth) was once energy from the sun.

5-LS1-1
Support an argument that plants get the materials they need for growth chiefly from air and water.

5-LS2-1
Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.

Connections to Engineering, Technology, and Applications in Science
3-5-ETS1-2 Engineering Design
Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.

Influence on Science, Engineering, and Technology on Society and the Natural World
3-5-ETS1-1
Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for
success and constraints on materials, time, or cost.

Grades 6-8

Performance Expectations

MS-LS1-4
Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively. [Clarification Statement: Examples of behaviors that affect the probability of animal reproduction could include nest building to protect young from cold, herding of animals to protect young from predators, and vocalization of animals and colorful plumage to attract mates for breeding. Examples of animal behaviors that affect the probability of plant reproduction could include transferring pollen or seeds, and creating conditions for seed germination and growth.]

MS-LS1-5
Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how environmental and genetic factors influence the growth of organisms.

MS-LS1-6
Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for the role of photosynthesis in the cycling of matter and flow of energy into and out of organisms.

MS-LS2-1
Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.
Develop a model to describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem.

MS-LS2-2
Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.

MS-LS2-3
Develop a model to describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem.

MS-LS2-4
Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

MS-LS2-5
Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services.

Connections to Engineering, Technology, and Applications in Science
Students will be encouraged to ask questions and define problems, construct explanations and design solutions that incorporate STEM.

Biodiversity and Energy in Different Ecosystems

Performance Expectations

Grade 3

3-LS2-1
Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive.

3-LS3-1
Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence that plants and animals have traits inherited from parents and that variation of these traits exists in a group of similar organisms.

3-LS3-2
Use evidence to support the explanation that traits can be influences by the environment.

3-LS4-2
Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.

3-LS4-3
Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.

3-LS4-4
Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.

Grade 4

4-LS1-1
Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior and reproduction.

Grade 5

5-PS3-1
Use models to describe that energy in animals’ food (used for body repair, growth, motion, and to maintain body warmth) was once energy from the sun.

5-LS1-1
Support an argument that plants get the materials they need for growth chiefly from air and water.

5-LS2-1
Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.

Connections to Engineering, Technology, and Applications in Science
Students will be encouraged to ask questions and define problems, construct explanations and design solutions that incorporate STEM.

3-5-ETS1-2 Engineering Design
Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.

Influence on Science, Engineering, and Technology on Society and the Natural World
3-5-ETS1-1
Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for
success and constraints on materials, time, or cost.

Grades 6-8

Performance Expectations

MS-LS1-4
Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively. [Clarification Statement: Examples of behaviors that affect the probability of animal reproduction could include nest building to protect young from cold, herding of animals to protect young from predators, and vocalization of animals and colorful plumage to attract mates for breeding. Examples of animal behaviors that affect the probability of plant reproduction could include transferring pollen or seeds, and creating conditions for seed germination and growth.]

MS-LS1-5
Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how environmental and genetic factors influence the growth of organisms.

MS-LS1-6
Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for the role of photosynthesis in the cycling of matter and flow of energy into and out of organisms.

MS-LS2-1
Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.
Develop a model to describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem.

MS-LS2-4
Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

MS-LS2-5
Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services.

Connections to Engineering, Technology, and Applications in Science
Students will be encouraged to ask questions and define problems, construct explanations and design solutions.

Military History at the First Division Museum

First in War

Grade 4

ILSS.H.1.4 Explain connections among historical contexts and why individuals and groups differed in their perspectives during the historical period.

Grade 5

ILSS.H.3.5. Explain probable causes and effects of events and developments in U.S. history.
ILSS.H.1.5 Create and use a chronological sequence of related events to compare developments that happened at the same time.

Grades 6-8

ILSS.H.1.6-8.LC. Classify series of historical events and developments as examples of change and/or continuity.
ILSS.H.1.6-8.MdC. Analyze connections among events and developments in broader historical contexts.
ILSS.H.4.6-8.LC. Explain multiple causes and effects of historical events.

Grades 9-12

ILSS.H.2.9-12. Analyze change and continuity within and across historical eras.
ILSS.H.4.9-12. Analyze how people and institutions have reacted to environmental, scientific, and technological challenges.
ILSS.H.7.9-12. Identify the role of individuals, groups, and institutions in people’s struggle for safety, freedom, equality, and justice.
ILSS.H.10.9-12. Analyze the causes and effects of global conflicts and economic crisis.

Duty First

Grades 4-5 Inquiry Skills

Pre-Visit Q-Storm can help get you started. Use the exhibit as a source. The soldier story pods have male and female soldiers from a variety of ethnic backgrounds talking about the missions they went on and how they felt about their service. The tank battle recreation and counterinsurgency house raid virtual reality will allow students to see a mission from the soldier perspective. The visitor engagement interactive allows students delve deeply into the decision-making process about when and where to deploy our military. The artifacts tell a story about the tools used and the exhibit text provides context. Additional research and a debrief can be done in the classroom.
ILSS.IS.1.3-5. Develop essential questions and explain the importance of the questions to self and others.
ILSS.IS.2.3-5. Create supporting questions to help answer essential questions in an inquiry.
ILSS.IS.3.3-5. Determine sources representing multiple points of view that will assist in answering essential questions.
ILSS.IS.4.3-5. Gather relevant information and distinguish among fact and opinion to determine credibility or multiple sources.
ILSS.IS.5.3-5. Develop claims using evidence from multiple sources to answer essential questions.

5th Grade History

ILSS.H.2.5- Use information about a historical source – including the maker, date, place of origin, intended audience, and purpose- to judge the extent to which the source is useful for studying a particular topic.
ILSS.H.3.5. Explain probable causes and effects of events and developments in U.S. history.

Grades 6-8 Inquiry Skills

Use the exhibit as a source. The soldier story pods have male and female soldiers from a variety of ethnic backgrounds talking about the missions they went on and how they felt about their service. The tank battle recreation and counterinsurgency house raid virtual reality will allow students to see a mission from the soldier perspective. The visitor engagement interactive allows students delve deeply into the decision-making process about when and where to deploy our military. The artifacts tell a story about the tools used and the exhibit text provides context. Additional research and a debrief can be done in the classroom. Pre-Visit Q-Storm can help get you started.

ILSS.IS.1.6-8. Create essential questions to help guide inquiry about a topic.
ILSS.IS.2.6-8. Ask essential questions that will lead to independent research.
ILSS.IS.3.6-8. Determine sources representing multiple points of view that will assist in organizing a research plan.
ILSS.IS.4.6-8. Gather relevant information from credible sources and determine whether they support each other.
ILSS.IS.5.6-8. Develop claims and counterclaims while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both.

Grades 6-8

ILSS.H.1.6-8.LC. Classify series of historical events and developments as examples of change and/or continuity.
ILSS.H.1.6-8.MdC. Analyze connections among events and developments in broader historical contexts.
ILSS.H.2.6-8.MdC. Analyze multiple factors that influenced the perspectives of people during different historical eras.
ILSS.H.4.6-8.LC. Explain multiple causes and effects of historical events.
ILSS.CV.1.6-8.LC. Identify roles played by citizens (examples: voters, jurors, taxpayers, military, protesters, and office-holders)

Grades 9-12 Inquiry Skills

Use the exhibit as a source. The soldier story pods have male and female soldiers from a variety of ethnic backgrounds talking about the missions they went on and how they felt about their service. The tank battle recreation and counterinsurgency house raid virtual reality will allow students to see a mission from the soldier perspective. The visitor engagement interactive allows students delve deeply into the decision-making process about when and where to deploy our military. The artifacts tell a story about the tools used and the exhibit text provides context. Additional research and a debrief can be done in the classroom.
Pre-Visit Q-Storm can help get you started.

ILSS.IS.1.9-12. Address essential questions that reflect an enduring issue in the field.
ILSS.IS.2.9-12. Explaining how supporting question contribute to an inquiry.
ILSS.IS.3.9-12. Develop new supporting and essential questions through investigation, collaboration, and using diverse sources.
ILSS.IS.4.9-12. Gather and evaluate information from multiple sources while considering the origin, credibility, point of view, authority, structure, context, and corroborative value of the sources.
ILSS.IS.5.9-12. Identify evidence that draws information from multiple sources to revise or strengthen claims.

Grades 9-12

ILSS.H.7.9-12. Identify the role of individuals, groups, and institutions in people’s struggle for safety, freedom, equality, and justice.
ILSS.H.8.9-12. Analyze key historical events and contributions of individuals through a variety of perspectives, including those of historically underrepresented groups.
ILSS.CV.1.9-12. Distinguish the rights, roles, powers, and responsibilities of individuals and institutions in the political system.

Tank Tech

Grade 4

CC.SL.4. 2. Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
CC.SL.4.3. Identify the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points.

Grade 5

ILSS.H.3.5. Explain probable causes and effects of events and developments in U.S. history.
CC.SL.5.2. Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
CC.SL.5.3. Summarize the points a speaker makes and explain how each claim is supported by reasons and evidence.

Grades 6-8

ILSS.H.1.6-8.LC. Classify series of historical events or developments as examples of change and/or continuity.
ILSS.H.1.6-8.Mdc. Analyze connections among events and developments in broader historical contexts.
ILSS.H.4.6-8.MC. Organize applicable evidence into a coherent argument about the past.
CC.SL.4. Present claims and findings emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation. (Students have opportunity to practice skills according to grade and ability level.)

Grades 9-12

ILSS.H.1.9-12. Evaluate how historical developments were shaped by time and place as well as broader historical contexts.
ILSS.H.2.9-12. Analyze change and continuity within and across historical eras.
ILSS.H.4.9-12. Analyze how people and institutions have reacted to environmental, scientific, and technological challenges.
CC.SL.4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task. (Students have opportunity to practice skills according to grade and ability level.)

Artifact Adventure

Grades 6-8

ILSS.H.1.6-8.LC. Classify series of historical events and developments as examples of change and/or continuity.
CC.RH.6-8.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.
CC.RH.6-8.7. Integrate visual information (e.g. in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.

Grades 9-12

ILSS.G.1.9-12. Use maps, satellite images, and photographs to display and explain the spatial patterns of physical, cultural political, economic, and environmental characteristics.
ILSS.H.2.9-12. Analyze change and continuity within and across historical eras.
CC.RH.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases s they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social studies.

Elementary Artifact Adventure

Grade 4

CC.RI.4.1. Refer to details and examples in text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
CC.RI.4.9. Integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

Grade 5

CC.RI.5.3. Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.
CC.RI.5.9. Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

WWII Home Front USA

Grade 4

ILSS.CV.2.4. Explain how a democracy relies on people’s responsible participation, and draw implications for how individuals should participate.
CC.RI.4.9. Integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgably.

Grade 5

ILSS.CV.4.5. Explain how policies are developed to address public problems.
ILSS.H.2.5. Use information about a historical source-including the maker, date, place or origin, intended audience, and purpose-to judge the extent to which the source is useful for studying a particular topic.
CC.RI.5.9. Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

History and Civics at the Robert R. McCormick House

Hands On at the Mansion

Reading Standards

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.4
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.6
Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRRA.R.7
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

Social Studies and Civics Standards

Determining Helpful Sources
SS.IS.3.3-5
Determine sources representing multiple points of view that will assist in answering essential questions.

Participation and Deliberation: Applying Civic Virtures and Democratic Processes
SS.CV.3.4
Identify core civic virtues (such as honesty, mutual respect, cooperation, and attentiveness to multiple perspectives) and democratic principles (such as equality, freedom, liberty, and respect for individual rights) that guide our state and nation.

SS.CV.1.6-8.MC
Evaluate the powers and responsibilities of citizens, political parties, interest groups, and the media.

SS.H.2.6-8.MdC
Analyze multiple factors that influenced the perspectives of people during different historical eras.

Gathering and Evaluating Sources
SS.IS.4.9-12
Gather and evaluate information from multiple sources while considering the origin, credibility, point of view, authority, structure, context, and corroborative value of the sources

Touring the Mansion

Reading Standards

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.1
Read closely to determine what the texts say explicitly and to make logical inferences from; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.6
Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRRA.R.7
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

Social Studies and Civics Standards

Participation and Deliberation: Applying Civic Virtures and Democratic Processes
SS.CV.1.6-8.MC
Evaluate the powers and responsibilities of citizens, political parties, interest groups, and the media.

SS.H.2.6-8.MdC
Analyze multiple factors that influenced the perspectives of people during different historical eras.

Gathering and Evaluating Sources
SS.IS.4.9-12
Gather and evaluate information from multiple sources while considering the origin, credibility, point of view, authority, structure, context, and corroborative value of the sources